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Now Through fall 2016
Conceived by American artist Joseph Kosuth, this installation includes a selection of his work along with a group of seminal works by Marcel Duchamp from the Museum’s collection. The installation takes as its point of departure Duchamp’s notion of “elementary parallelism,” coined to refer to his pictorial treatment of time and movement in Nude Descending a Staircase (No. 2), from 1912. This same expression finds concrete resonance in Kosuth’s ‘An Elementary Parallelism’, from 2013, which is the starting point for the installation unfolding across four gallery walls. For Kosuth, the phrase serves as a springboard to investigate the multiple ways in which his work intersects with that of Duchamp.
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Now Through spring 2016
To honor Pope Francis on the occasion of his visit to the United States, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Association for Public Art are pleased to present Robert Indiana’s monumental sculpture AMOR (1998) on the Museum’s East Terrace. The colorful, six-foot-high sculpture overlooks the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, site of the public papal mass that culminated the World Meeting of Families 2015, the world’s largest Catholic gathering of families.
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Now Through February 21, 2016
From a crowd gathered in Central Park to solitary figures lost in thought, Dave Heath’s images conjure feelings of alienation and a desire for human connection. Multitude, Solitude highlights the photographer’s black-and-white pictures of the 1950s and 1960s, an intense period of self-discovery and innovation for the artist. During these pivotal years, Heath developed groundbreaking approaches to narrative and image sequence, producing exquisite individual prints, handmade book maquettes, his poetic masterwork, A Dialogue with Solitude, and multimedia slide presentations. His sensitive explorations of loss, pain, love, and hope reveal Heath to be one of the most original photographers of those decades.
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Now Through February 2016
Taking cues from the Dada movement and from the work of Swiss sculptor Alberto Giacometti, Cy Twombly (American, 1928– 2011) created poetic objects whose serene white surfaces and allusive forms seem to recall remote worlds of myth and the ancient past. After reaching an indisputable maturity in his early sculpture, created from 1946 to 1959, Twombly returned to working in three dimensions in the mid-1970s and continued to cast new works up until his passing in 2011.
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Now Through March 20, 2016
This exhibition offers a look at beautiful woven textiles of the Zo people of Myanmar, India, and Bangladesh. It spotlights traditional weavings worn for daily life and ceremonial occasions, such as weddings, funerals, and feasts of merit. Patterns, techniques, and local variations are closely examined, revealing the extraordinary beauty and craftsmanship of these distinctive creations.
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Now Through March 27, 2016
This exhibition presents masterful drawings from the royal courts of northern India. Lovingly amassed by artist Conley Harris and architectural designer Howard Truelove, the collection features practice sketches, preparatory drawings, subtly modeled scenes, and lightly colored compositions created between the 1500s and 1800s. With images at different stages of completion, the collection allows for a fascinating look at Indian workshop practice. Although the majority of the drawings served as preparatory studies for paintings, they are accomplished works of art in their own right.
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Now Through April 3, 2016
Picture This features the work of four contemporary photographers for whom India is an important subject or setting: Gauri Gill, Sunil Gupta, Max Pinckers, and Pamela Singh. Diverse in nationality and place of residence, each of these artists brings a cosmopolitan perspective to his or her work. Whether photographing in rural Rajasthan or major cities like Mumbai or New York, they offer points of view that do not fit easily into categories of “insider” or “outsider.”
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Now Through April 3, 2016
Bruce Mau is internationally recognized for his achievements in design, including visual identities, brand systems, books, packaging, and exhibition graphics. His most recent work applies design tools and concepts to environmental, social, economic, and political problems. This exhibition offers examples of Mau’s innovative solutions for clients like Coca-Cola, the country of Guatemala, and Biomuseo in Panama City, presenting a portrait of a tireless designer at the vanguard of the field’s search for solutions to global concerns.
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Now Through May 22, 2016
Selected by artist Joseph Marioni, the paintings in this installation represent a focused survey of his work. At first appearing monochromatic, Marioni’s canvases produce color sensations that shift with changes in light and viewpoint. In fact, each work features several distinct layers of acrylic paint of contrasting colors and intensities. Through unhurried contemplation, we can gain a deeper understanding that color is not a fixed entity, but rather subject to fluctuations of light and our own perception.

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