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Singular Effects of the Universal Vegetable Pills on a Green Grocer! A Fact!
Plate 8 from Grant's Oddities (London, 1841)

Charles Jameson Grant, British, active 1829 - 1866. Published by J. Kendrick, 54 Leicester Square, London.

Geography:
Published in London, England, Europe

Date:
1841

Medium:
Hand-colored lithograph

Dimensions:
Image: 10 3/4 x 9 7/8 inches (27.3 x 25.1 cm) Sheet: 16 13/16 x 11 15/16 inches (42.7 x 30.3 cm)

Curatorial Department:
Prints, Drawings, and Photographs

Object Location:

Currently not on view

Accession Number:
1988-102-100

Credit Line:
The William H. Helfand Collection, 1988

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Additional information:
  • PublicationPicture of Health: Images of Medicine and Pharmacy from the William H. Helfand Collection

    The promotion of Morison's Vegetable Pills in the 1830s and 1840s was not only ubiquitous but also excessive, promising cures for a wide spectrum of ailments, including tuberculosis, jaundice, and tic douloureux (see also Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1988-102-14). Not surprisingly, such immoderate claims provoked critical and satirical reaction. Grant's print shows the frightening- but humorous--side effects produced when a green grocer was caught in the rain after having taken "132 Boxes of Vegetables Pills"; since this event occurred on April 1, however, it cannot be meant to be taken too seriously. William H. Helfand, from The Picture of Health: Images of Medicine and Pharmacy from the William H. Helfand Collection (1991), p. 85.

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