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Highlights

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October 16, 2018 - March 3, 2019
Experience the drama and glamour of some of the most creative feminine fashions ever designed, from romantic ball gowns to audacious contemporary ensembles, and everything in between. See how designers have used color and pattern, shape and volume, draping, metallics, and embellishments to continually reinvent the art form. The pieces in the exhibition—daywear, bridal wear, and more—showcase the Museum’s outstanding costume collection. Many are on view for the first time.
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November 11, 2018 - March 3, 2019
Before Barbie and American Girl, there was Miss Fanchon. The ultimate toy for privileged girls in the 1860s and 1870s, she and her friends were seen as models of ladylike perfection. These dolls came with an amazing array of dresses, undergarments, and meticulously crafted accessories, from gloves and jewelry to roller skates and calling cards. Bring the kids—or just your love of all things miniature—and marvel at these tiny Victorian treasures.
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November 18, 2018 - April 14, 2019
Love the look and feel of your smartphone? Thank Dieter Rams. His quietly innovative versions of household products, stripped of any extraneous features, continue to influence industrial design today. Throughout a celebrated career at the German manufacturer Braun and the furniture company Vitsœ, Rams created elegant and intuitive forms that remain timeless monuments to understatement and ease of use.
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April 16, 2019 - August 18, 2019
Peer over the shoulder of Claude Monet, Mary Cassatt, Vincent van Gogh, and others as they make their indelible mark on canvas, paper, and bronze. Best known as oil painters, the artists in this tight-knit group actually moved fluidly from one medium to another, supporting and inspiring one another. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to see a broad range of Impressionist sculpture, painting, and works on paper shown together.
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April 16, 2019 - August 18, 2019
Conventional in his beliefs and inventive in his art, Yoshitoshi created vivid, dynamic imagery that responded to the rapid modernization of Japan during the late 1800s. Discover the brilliant colors and spirited lines of the last great master of the traditional Japanese woodblock print, whose work inspired modern-day manga and anime.

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