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Highlights

Two Dragons [in Clouds]
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February 16, 2015 - May 10, 2015
Ink and Gold explores the stunning artistry of the esteemed Kano painters, the most enduring and influential school of painting in Japanese history. Established by Kano Masanobu in the fifteenth century, the lineage created and upheld standards of artistic excellence in Japan for nearly five hundred years. The exhibition presents more than 120 works of art spanning the school’s long and illustrious history with a focus on large-scale, gold leaf folding screens and sliding doors designed for residences of Japan’s ruling elite. This exhibition, which also includes ink paintings, hanging scrolls, and folding fans, is the first outside Japan—and the first anywhere since 1979—to so fully examine the Kano painters’ legacy.
Dance at Bougival
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June 24, 2015 - September 13, 2015
Despite the popularity of Impressionism today, the groundbreaking shifts that occurred in French painting at the end of the nineteenth century were not immediately embraced by collectors, dealers, or the public. A vital figure in the rise of Impressionism is Paul Durand-Ruel (1831–1922), a practical, ambitious, and visionary Parisian art dealer who enthusiastically championed the new style of painting. Discovering the Impressionists examines the critical years from 1865 to 1905 when Durand-Ruel both inspired and sustained artists like Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Édouard Manet, Camille Pissarro, Alfred Sisley, and Edgar Degas.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
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January 10, 2015 - April 5, 2015
This exhibition highlights selections from the Museum’s exceptional holdings of African American art and celebrates the publication of a catalogue examining the breadth of these noteworthy collections. With work by renowned artists such as Henry Ossawa Tanner, Horace Pippin, Jacob Lawrence, Martin Puryear, and Carrie Mae Weems, the exhibition showcases a range of subjects, styles, mediums, and traditions. Since the Museum’s acquisition of Tanner’s painting The Annunciation in 1899, its collections of African American art have grown significantly, especially during the last three decades.
Birth and Baptismal Certificate for Anna Maria Weinhold
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February 1, 2015 - April 26, 2015
One of the most admired forms of American folk art, fraktur are decorated Germanic documents featuring brilliant colors and often whimsical imagery. Transplanted to Pennsylvania by German-speaking immigrants in the 1700s, these hand-drawn or printed works on paper are distinguished by a broken (or “fractured”) style of lettering. Small yet exuberant, fraktur celebrated important moments in the personal and domestic lives of Pennsylvania Germans.
Seeds to Seeds (detail), 2014
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March 7, 2015 - September 27, 2015
Shelley Spector has been actively engaged in Philadelphia’s arts community for years as a respected artist, innovative gallery owner, and champion of emerging talent. Her inventive use of pattern and salvaged materials intrigued senior curator Dilys Blum, who invited Spector to explore the Museum’s collection of textiles and create an installation of new artwork. Spector’s moving response is Keep the Home Fires Burning, a walk-through presentation of wood and textile-based sculpture that reflects on the universal quest for hope, home, and connectedness.
Two Calla Lilies on Pink
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October 27, 2015 - January 10, 2016
The first survey of American still life in three decades, Audubon to Warhol: The Art of American Still Life will feature some 120 oil paintings, watercolors, and works in other media representing the finest accomplishments in the genre from its beginnings in the early 1800s to the Pop Art era of the 1960s.

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