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Highlights

Womanâs Ensemble
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April 27, 2014 - November 30, 2014
This retrospective presents the joyful and colorful fashions of African American designer Patrick Kelly, who took Paris by storm in the 1980s. Inspired by his Mississippi roots, the nightclubs of New York and Paris, Josephine Baker, and celebrated couturiers Coco Chanel and Elsa Schiaparelli, Kelly infused his bold designs with a sly sense of humor, subverting not only fashion but also racial stereotypes.
Wall Street, New York
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October 21, 2014 - January 4, 2015
This major retrospective presents the work of a critical figure in the history of modern art, photographer and filmmaker Paul Strand (American, 1890–1976), whose archive of nearly 4,000 prints stands as a cornerstone of the Museum’s collection. It surveys Strand’s entire life’s work, including his breakthrough trials in abstraction and street portraits, close-ups of natural and machine forms, and extended explorations of the American Southwest, Mexico, New England, France, Italy, Scotland, Egypt, Morocco, Ghana, and Romania.
Womanâs Cigarette Dress
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April 27, 2014 - November 30, 2014
The legacy of the late African American fashion designer Patrick Kelly (c. 1954–1990) endures in the whimsical street-wear brand Gerlan Jeans. Launched in 2009 by New York–based designer and graphic artist Gerlan Marcel (born 1976), Gerlan Jeans reinterprets Kelly’s signature bows, buttons, and other bold embellishments to create clothes for men and women “who have a sense of fearlessness in the way they dress.”
Untitled (girls' faces flashed in bus window)
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May 24, 2014 - August 3, 2014
Explore diverse examples of flash photography, which gained widespread use in the 1920s with the invention of the mass-produced flashbulb.
Le Jouer de Flute
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May 24, 2014 - August 3, 2014
This exhibition focuses on Pablo Picasso’s response to the world of classical antiquity in nearly fifty prints from four critical decades of his career. His wide-ranging interests in ancient art, mythology, and literature were a continual source of inspiration for the compulsively creative artist, who infused them with his personal mythology.

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