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Museum Publications

The Publishing Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art develops, produces, and publishes the Museum's books, handbooks, and collection and exhibition catalogues, as well as the Bulletin, an occasional scholarly publication. The department collaborates with other institutions on joint exhibition publications, and arranges for the distribution and co-publication of its titles in the trade in the United States and abroad.

New Releases

This chunky little book—published in conjunction with the exhibition Shelley Spector: Keep the Home Fires Burning—is a record of the artist’s hands-on, labor-intensive process. Using her smartphone as an archive and sketchbook, Spector captured more than two hundred color photographs of her Philadelphia studio, works in progress, and sources of inspiration. The images are accompanied with an essay by Matthew F. Singer, Senior Museum Writer and Communications Officer, Philadelphia Museum of Art.
The Kano lineage of painters—the most important in Japan—was established in the late fifteenth century by Kano Masanobu (1434–1530) and continued for nearly 400 years. Originally limited to successive generations of the Kano family, it soon developed into a school of professional artists. Ink and Gold is the first and most comprehensive book published outside of Japan to address the Kano painters. Lavishly illustrated, this important volume focuses on the large-scale screens and sliding doors that were designed for the residences of powerful rulers, together with smaller works such as scrolls, albums, and fans.
Among the most beloved forms of American folk art, fraktur is a Germanic tradition of decorated manuscripts and printed documents noted for its use of bold colors and whimsical motifs. This publication makes a landmark contribution to the study of Pennsylvania German fraktur, and offers the most comprehensive study of the topic in over 50 years. The featured objects, most of which have never been published, accompany significant new information about the artists who made these works and the people who owned them.
This publication highlights nearly 150 objects in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art that were created by American artists of African descent. Introduced with an essay by the distinguished scholar Richard J. Powell, the volume includes paintings, sculpture, works on paper, decorative arts, costume and textiles, and photography by some 100 artists, from classically trained painters such as Henry Ossawa Tanner to self-taught artists such as Bill Traylor. Informative, thematic essays by the consulting curator, Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw, are followed by individual object entries as well as texts spotlighting areas of collecting strength, many of them written by members of the museum's curatorial staff.
This fully updated and beautifully redesigned handbook is the essential guide to the encyclopedic collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Divided into four sections-Asia, Europe, the Americas, and Contemporary-the handbook features more than 500 masterpieces from the museum's world-renowned holdings, each handsomely illustrated in color and accompanied by a brief text written by the museum's curators.

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