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August 25th, 2004
Challenge #2 Continues the Fleisher Art Memorial

The Samuel S. Fleisher Art Memorial will present the second exhibition in the twentyseventh season of the four-part Challenge Series -- the Delaware Valley’s premier juried artist exhibition program. This season’s twelve Challenge artists were selected from a field of 255 applicants to exhibit in one of four three-person exhibitions. Challenge #2 features the work of artists Stephen Binasiewicz, Rachel Clark, and Hiro Sakaguchi. These three artists share a common concern for intellectual dialogue with their audience, but each artist’s imagery is quite different. The exhibition begins on Friday, October 15 with an opening reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., and continues through November 13. Both the exhibition and the opening reception are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday; with additional hours of 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Saturday.

Exploring a personal vision motivates Stephen Binasiewicz to develop the inner vocabulary of his sculptural objects. In some cases, the objects suggest the nature of the person that has handled it; while in others, the enigmatic nature or history of the object itself prompts the imagery. Binasiewicz’s constructions often have a kinetic component that activates such objects as combs, dolls, etc. Mr. Binasiewicz received his B.F.A. from Tyler School of Art, Temple University.

Rachel Clark is showing an installation of sculpted heads that are actually round hollow vessels. Each opens to the world through one of the senses: sight, taste, etc. The vessels are presented in a way that embodies stillness, evoking a feeling of floating and timelessness. While the objects represent human heads, Clark is most interested in the internal space of the forms and their representation of imagination. She uses water with the forms to make implied references to the liquid state of the body and transformations that occur in the physical realm. Ms. Clark received her B.F.A. from the School of Visual Arts (New York) and her M.F.A. from the Maryland Institute College of Art.

Hiro Sakaguchi is compelled to make objects that contain a fictional realm that is relevant to his life experience as an artist and an individual in this global society. Sakaguchi confronts the viewer with provocative paintings containing cityscapes dominated by ships or airplanes that draw one into an unusual visual dialogue. Mr. Sakaguchi received his B.F.A. from the University of the Arts and his M.F.A. from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

On Thursday, November 4, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., artist/teacher Mary Murphy will lead the Challenge "TalkAbout" gallery discussion. Bring your own ‘brown bag’ dinner and join us to discuss the work on exhibition. Admission is free.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is among the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Its facilities include its landmark Main Building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the Perelman Building, located nearby on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum on the 2200 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and two 18th-century houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. The Museum offers a wide variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts and films.

For additional information, contact the Marketing and Communications Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art at (215) 684-7860. The Philadelphia Museum of Art is located on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at 26th Street. For general information, call (215) 763-8100, or visit the Museum's website at www.philamuseum.org.

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