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Membership—Your Ticket to So Much More

More art…more beauty…more inspiration…more fun…more connections…more surprises…more memories.

Members experience more of what makes the Museum the cultural heart of Philadelphia.

Join or Renew Today


Members’ Previews for Embracing the Contemporary

Explore a sample of the extraordinary works in this exhibition.
View Slideshow >>


The Museum’s art and staff inspired the Sachs when they started collecting contemporary art. View their lovingly curated collection during our exclusive Members’ Previews before the show opens to the public.

Opening Celebration Associates and above ($2,500+)
Thursday, June 23 | 5:30–8:30 p.m.

Museum Circle Preview $500 Sustainers and above ($500+)
Friday, June 24, 5:00–8:45 p.m.

Members’ Previews (all levels)
Saturday, June 25, and Sunday, June 26, 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

An Insider’s Tour

June 25 or June 26; 3:15 p.m.
We invite all Artist members to join us for special exhibition tours during the Members’ Previews. Delve into the creative process and installation of the Sachs’ collection. Exhibition Assistant Anna Mecugni will share insights and discoveries from working with the exhibition. Reserve your spot by calling 215-235-7469.


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More Art
Unlimited free general admission to
  • Your iconic Museum and all of its masterpieces
  • An urban oasis dedicated to the sculpture of Auguste Rodin
  • Contemporary galleries in a landmark Art Deco building
  • Two historic houses with compelling stories in Fairmount Park
More Savings
  • $10 general admission for your guests
  • Member parking rate in the Museum’s garage: only $8 for the first 5 hours
  • 10% off Museum dining and shopping every time you visit*
  • 20% off programs
  • 10% off class and workshop tuition at Fleisher Art Memorial
  • 5% off Museum facility rental fees
More Access
  • Free exhibition tickets (number of tickets varies by level)
  • Free admission and exhibition tickets for all children in your life (18 and under)
  • Members-only tours, trips, programs, and previews
  • Free admission to Wednesday Nights—a casual atmosphere with creative programs
  • Free admission to Art After 5—our Friday night cabaret
  • Admission for 2 at 60 museums across North America for Keystone members or higher
*excludes tax, gratuity, and alcoholic beverages


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Member Offers

June 2016

Members save 10% at Fleisher Art Memorial
Now through June 30, 2016
Save on class and workshop tuition when you use promo code PMAMEMBER at Fleisher Art Memorial, through October 2016.


Cafeteria—complimentary dessert
Now through June 30, 2016
With lunch purchase in the Perelman Building Gallery Café.


Close
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Member Voices

In April we asked, “What is “Pop” to You?”

Here are the responses:
  • Interesting questions. As an active museum visitor pop art is very low on my list. Let me say this. There are plenty of art forms that I have no interest in. That's just my taste and does not disclaim that any of the forms that I am not interested in are "bad."

    Pop has pieces that once explained are, to say the very least, interesting. They can be very thought provoking, very moving, and can deliver monumental messages. However, the bulk of it needs a full description of what the message is or what is going on. I was listening to a couple of Pop fans at an exhibition carrying on about a piece like it was at least the replacement for the Mona Lisa. I asked what was the meaning of the piece. I received a dead stare. They liked it and that's OK. I would ask that the curators of the pop exhibits take the time to have placards available with an explanation or at least an educated paragraph about what pop fans think it is.
  • There are not many shows at the PMA that I have truly hated. In fact, that has never happened before, and I've been to nearly every one over the past 40+ years. But I hated International Pop. It made me angry. I'm trying to analyze why, and I just don't know. Basically it was ugly, ugly, ugly. I like all periods and genres of art, including modern, but this was just awful.
  • The exhibition International Pop was a revelation. Totally convincing that the POP movement was not an American phenomenon with a small British division, but INTERNATIONAL in scope. Mind-altering and terrifically entertaining with many rare masterpieces and only the occasional old chestnut that was cheerfully included. Well curated show and great fun. Well worth the drive from NYC to see this show.
  • Pop Art is a satire on traditional fine art and how it becomes relatable to the viewers. It’s relate-able, view-able, and it is not abstract.
  • There probably has been enough "POP."
  • POP is the explosion of art generated by the freedom from social traditions taking place in the U.S. in the late 1950s and onward. Images from POPular culture invaded artspaces, trash became art, sculpture went soft, and repetition reigned to provide art access to the masses. POP appropriated images from modern culture, parading them as art, and begging the question once again, “What is art?” More importantly, POP energized the search for the new Avant-Guard that continues to this day. That's what POP means to me.
  • In my mind, art is a many-faceted abstraction that can be interpreted very differently depending on the individual observer. What the original artist intended is irrelevant. Does a composer expect the audience to dream up picturesque scenes in their minds as they listen to a performance? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Sometimes the imagery is intentional. Often times it is not.

    Art is all things; ugly, political, social, anti-establishment, propaganda, dirty, sexual, offensive, cold, warm, beautiful, innocent, intelligent, and many, many other facets. Beyond interpretation, art is something all cultures create and experience. Like language, science, and math, art is something that connects all of humanity across borders, beliefs, and cultures. Its importance cannot be overstated.

    Pop art is important. Often, it is linked to societal changes and upheavals. Looking at older Pop art can be like looking through a window to those times, and seeing the big craze of the time, what big events were occurring, or simply looking into the culture of the time, and seeing what people were experiencing in the day-to-day. The same could be said for popular music. As we progress, breaking down limitations and barriers in society, Pop art also advances and progresses. It is not afraid of experimentation or being on the bleeding edge. That can enhance our perceptions, encourage abstract thinking, or simply inspire us in new ways. In that sense, Pop art has a profound effect on the world.

During Members Month we asked “Why do you love being a member?”
Here are the responses:
  • Oh what a time to be alive!
  • The lounge is great. Thanks for creating it. The Museum is terrific. It’s always interesting and there is something for people of all ages. It gives us grandparents a way to get a new generation into a love of the arts.
  • Revisiting my long-time friends—the magnificent and often changing collection of snuff bottles—in the Asian art gallery. And now, the Members’ Lounge—a great, confortable space to get away from the crowds.
  • Such a special place. So good for the soul.
  • Because I like art.
  • I just joined today 3/4/16 and I joined because these are fantastic museums! Also, being a member will make me come up to Philly more often from Baltimore.
  • Having unlimited access to world class art.
  • I love art! Expressing texture, forms, color, etc. etc. etc! Beauty in every form!
  • PMA is my home away from home. Always refreshing and new. Can’t get enough of what PMA has to offer. Thank you, PMA.
  • Attending spotlight conversations.
  • I love being a member because of the way I feel when I am here. I have been a member for 40 years. I am an Art History Grad. I share the Museum with everyone. Here today with 94 year-old Mother and 82 year-old Mother-in-Law. A bit of beauty, history, and a great lunch are in order.
  • We heart art!
  • I’m a member as well as a volunteer at the Museum. I love the programs here, the people, not to mention the great art collection! Here, everyone can find something fun to do! I absolutely love this new Members’ Lounge, especially the “postcard station!” What an awesome idea. It’s great to be a member at the PMA!
  • All the staff are so nice and the Museum is so kind friendly! We especially love Art After 5.
  • By being members we feel more inclined to come because we feel a part of the Museum. We’re making art part of our lives.
  • Because I can relax in the lounge with tea or coffee while I decide which members-only collection tour to take next and discover neat art catalogues, like “Landscape of Slavery” edited by Mack and Hoffius, tucked among Miro works on the wall.
  • I like art and it is an art museum and I like learning about art. I like seeing famous art, and I like doing art.
  • I heart that you are open late on Wed + Fridays 2x the opportunities to explore=happiness. Thank you
  • Art Museum membership is one of my best annual investments. Art and beauty, all year long!
  • Now that I am a member, I am discovering parts of the Museum that I have never seen. I can come for short—or long—visits whenever I want!
  • Membership makes us part of the legacy of art. Supporting PMA is a way of contributing to the community in a positive way! The Museum is cool and comfortable (and totally tubular)
  • The Philadelphia Museum of Art definitely appreciates its members more than other similar institutions I’ve been a member at.
  • Love is in the air. Life is so civilized when you are a member.
  • I like the Knights (age 4). Art Splash + Armor (age 12). The family hands-on events.
  • I live in the neighborhood and there is always something going on at the Museum if I have no plans. Plus, it expands my mind!
  • I like how the Museum is working hard to broaden its appeal in creative ways in the physical space, new tour ideas, programs, etc. Keep on!
  • Oh, how do I love thee—let me count the ways! (Too many to count).
  • Members are treated with great care. We can feel at home here. Thank you, a member.
  • The Museum is a global treasure, and I love being a part of it. The exhibits and programming are bold and innovative, with an outstanding historic collection as well.
  • Art. They have pencils. I like to draw pictures. I like to see art. (age 3)
  • That I get to make art. (age 5)
  • I like being a member because you can see art for free.

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we asked our members how they think art can serve people.

Claudia Librett, member since 2009, eloquently responded:

Illuminating truth, beauty, and love. Often truth that we shy away from is embraced or at least received when it is expressed through art. Beauty in nature and in art inspires and quiets our souls. Only when we move with our hearts in making art does it express and embody love.

No one can really thrive without art.

Practically from birth, my mom introduced me to great art in all forms and it has informed my career choices, enriched my life and fed my soul. I know for certain that it will do all that for my daughter as well.

Close
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Member Offers

June 2016

Members save 10% at Fleisher Art Memorial
Now through June 30, 2016
Save on class and workshop tuition when you use promo code PMAMEMBER at Fleisher Art Memorial, through October 2016.


Cafeteria—complimentary dessert
Now through June 30, 2016
With lunch purchase in the Perelman Building Gallery Café.


Close

Member Voices

In April we asked, “What is “Pop” to You?”

Here are the responses:
  • Interesting questions. As an active museum visitor pop art is very low on my list. Let me say this. There are plenty of art forms that I have no interest in. That's just my taste and does not disclaim that any of the forms that I am not interested in are "bad."

    Pop has pieces that once explained are, to say the very least, interesting. They can be very thought provoking, very moving, and can deliver monumental messages. However, the bulk of it needs a full description of what the message is or what is going on. I was listening to a couple of Pop fans at an exhibition carrying on about a piece like it was at least the replacement for the Mona Lisa. I asked what was the meaning of the piece. I received a dead stare. They liked it and that's OK. I would ask that the curators of the pop exhibits take the time to have placards available with an explanation or at least an educated paragraph about what pop fans think it is.
  • There are not many shows at the PMA that I have truly hated. In fact, that has never happened before, and I've been to nearly every one over the past 40+ years. But I hated International Pop. It made me angry. I'm trying to analyze why, and I just don't know. Basically it was ugly, ugly, ugly. I like all periods and genres of art, including modern, but this was just awful.
  • The exhibition International Pop was a revelation. Totally convincing that the POP movement was not an American phenomenon with a small British division, but INTERNATIONAL in scope. Mind-altering and terrifically entertaining with many rare masterpieces and only the occasional old chestnut that was cheerfully included. Well curated show and great fun. Well worth the drive from NYC to see this show.
  • Pop Art is a satire on traditional fine art and how it becomes relatable to the viewers. It’s relate-able, view-able, and it is not abstract.
  • There probably has been enough "POP."
  • POP is the explosion of art generated by the freedom from social traditions taking place in the U.S. in the late 1950s and onward. Images from POPular culture invaded artspaces, trash became art, sculpture went soft, and repetition reigned to provide art access to the masses. POP appropriated images from modern culture, parading them as art, and begging the question once again, “What is art?” More importantly, POP energized the search for the new Avant-Guard that continues to this day. That's what POP means to me.
  • In my mind, art is a many-faceted abstraction that can be interpreted very differently depending on the individual observer. What the original artist intended is irrelevant. Does a composer expect the audience to dream up picturesque scenes in their minds as they listen to a performance? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Sometimes the imagery is intentional. Often times it is not.

    Art is all things; ugly, political, social, anti-establishment, propaganda, dirty, sexual, offensive, cold, warm, beautiful, innocent, intelligent, and many, many other facets. Beyond interpretation, art is something all cultures create and experience. Like language, science, and math, art is something that connects all of humanity across borders, beliefs, and cultures. Its importance cannot be overstated.

    Pop art is important. Often, it is linked to societal changes and upheavals. Looking at older Pop art can be like looking through a window to those times, and seeing the big craze of the time, what big events were occurring, or simply looking into the culture of the time, and seeing what people were experiencing in the day-to-day. The same could be said for popular music. As we progress, breaking down limitations and barriers in society, Pop art also advances and progresses. It is not afraid of experimentation or being on the bleeding edge. That can enhance our perceptions, encourage abstract thinking, or simply inspire us in new ways. In that sense, Pop art has a profound effect on the world.

During Members Month we asked “Why do you love being a member?”
Here are the responses:
  • Oh what a time to be alive!
  • The lounge is great. Thanks for creating it. The Museum is terrific. It’s always interesting and there is something for people of all ages. It gives us grandparents a way to get a new generation into a love of the arts.
  • Revisiting my long-time friends—the magnificent and often changing collection of snuff bottles—in the Asian art gallery. And now, the Members’ Lounge—a great, confortable space to get away from the crowds.
  • Such a special place. So good for the soul.
  • Because I like art.
  • I just joined today 3/4/16 and I joined because these are fantastic museums! Also, being a member will make me come up to Philly more often from Baltimore.
  • Having unlimited access to world class art.
  • I love art! Expressing texture, forms, color, etc. etc. etc! Beauty in every form!
  • PMA is my home away from home. Always refreshing and new. Can’t get enough of what PMA has to offer. Thank you, PMA.
  • Attending spotlight conversations.
  • I love being a member because of the way I feel when I am here. I have been a member for 40 years. I am an Art History Grad. I share the Museum with everyone. Here today with 94 year-old Mother and 82 year-old Mother-in-Law. A bit of beauty, history, and a great lunch are in order.
  • We heart art!
  • I’m a member as well as a volunteer at the Museum. I love the programs here, the people, not to mention the great art collection! Here, everyone can find something fun to do! I absolutely love this new Members’ Lounge, especially the “postcard station!” What an awesome idea. It’s great to be a member at the PMA!
  • All the staff are so nice and the Museum is so kind friendly! We especially love Art After 5.
  • By being members we feel more inclined to come because we feel a part of the Museum. We’re making art part of our lives.
  • Because I can relax in the lounge with tea or coffee while I decide which members-only collection tour to take next and discover neat art catalogues, like “Landscape of Slavery” edited by Mack and Hoffius, tucked among Miro works on the wall.
  • I like art and it is an art museum and I like learning about art. I like seeing famous art, and I like doing art.
  • I heart that you are open late on Wed + Fridays 2x the opportunities to explore=happiness. Thank you
  • Art Museum membership is one of my best annual investments. Art and beauty, all year long!
  • Now that I am a member, I am discovering parts of the Museum that I have never seen. I can come for short—or long—visits whenever I want!
  • Membership makes us part of the legacy of art. Supporting PMA is a way of contributing to the community in a positive way! The Museum is cool and comfortable (and totally tubular)
  • The Philadelphia Museum of Art definitely appreciates its members more than other similar institutions I’ve been a member at.
  • Love is in the air. Life is so civilized when you are a member.
  • I like the Knights (age 4). Art Splash + Armor (age 12). The family hands-on events.
  • I live in the neighborhood and there is always something going on at the Museum if I have no plans. Plus, it expands my mind!
  • I like how the Museum is working hard to broaden its appeal in creative ways in the physical space, new tour ideas, programs, etc. Keep on!
  • Oh, how do I love thee—let me count the ways! (Too many to count).
  • Members are treated with great care. We can feel at home here. Thank you, a member.
  • The Museum is a global treasure, and I love being a part of it. The exhibits and programming are bold and innovative, with an outstanding historic collection as well.
  • Art. They have pencils. I like to draw pictures. I like to see art. (age 3)
  • That I get to make art. (age 5)
  • I like being a member because you can see art for free.

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we asked our members how they think art can serve people.

Claudia Librett, member since 2009, eloquently responded:

Illuminating truth, beauty, and love. Often truth that we shy away from is embraced or at least received when it is expressed through art. Beauty in nature and in art inspires and quiets our souls. Only when we move with our hearts in making art does it express and embody love.

No one can really thrive without art.

Practically from birth, my mom introduced me to great art in all forms and it has informed my career choices, enriched my life and fed my soul. I know for certain that it will do all that for my daughter as well.

Close
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test

test

Member Offers

June 2016

Members save 10% at Fleisher Art Memorial
Now through June 30, 2016
Save on class and workshop tuition when you use promo code PMAMEMBER at Fleisher Art Memorial, through October 2016.


Cafeteria—complimentary dessert
Now through June 30, 2016
With lunch purchase in the Perelman Building Gallery Café.


Close

Member Voices

In April we asked, “What is “Pop” to You?”

Here are the responses:
  • Interesting questions. As an active museum visitor pop art is very low on my list. Let me say this. There are plenty of art forms that I have no interest in. That's just my taste and does not disclaim that any of the forms that I am not interested in are "bad."

    Pop has pieces that once explained are, to say the very least, interesting. They can be very thought provoking, very moving, and can deliver monumental messages. However, the bulk of it needs a full description of what the message is or what is going on. I was listening to a couple of Pop fans at an exhibition carrying on about a piece like it was at least the replacement for the Mona Lisa. I asked what was the meaning of the piece. I received a dead stare. They liked it and that's OK. I would ask that the curators of the pop exhibits take the time to have placards available with an explanation or at least an educated paragraph about what pop fans think it is.
  • There are not many shows at the PMA that I have truly hated. In fact, that has never happened before, and I've been to nearly every one over the past 40+ years. But I hated International Pop. It made me angry. I'm trying to analyze why, and I just don't know. Basically it was ugly, ugly, ugly. I like all periods and genres of art, including modern, but this was just awful.
  • The exhibition International Pop was a revelation. Totally convincing that the POP movement was not an American phenomenon with a small British division, but INTERNATIONAL in scope. Mind-altering and terrifically entertaining with many rare masterpieces and only the occasional old chestnut that was cheerfully included. Well curated show and great fun. Well worth the drive from NYC to see this show.
  • Pop Art is a satire on traditional fine art and how it becomes relatable to the viewers. It’s relate-able, view-able, and it is not abstract.
  • There probably has been enough "POP."
  • POP is the explosion of art generated by the freedom from social traditions taking place in the U.S. in the late 1950s and onward. Images from POPular culture invaded artspaces, trash became art, sculpture went soft, and repetition reigned to provide art access to the masses. POP appropriated images from modern culture, parading them as art, and begging the question once again, “What is art?” More importantly, POP energized the search for the new Avant-Guard that continues to this day. That's what POP means to me.
  • In my mind, art is a many-faceted abstraction that can be interpreted very differently depending on the individual observer. What the original artist intended is irrelevant. Does a composer expect the audience to dream up picturesque scenes in their minds as they listen to a performance? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Sometimes the imagery is intentional. Often times it is not.

    Art is all things; ugly, political, social, anti-establishment, propaganda, dirty, sexual, offensive, cold, warm, beautiful, innocent, intelligent, and many, many other facets. Beyond interpretation, art is something all cultures create and experience. Like language, science, and math, art is something that connects all of humanity across borders, beliefs, and cultures. Its importance cannot be overstated.

    Pop art is important. Often, it is linked to societal changes and upheavals. Looking at older Pop art can be like looking through a window to those times, and seeing the big craze of the time, what big events were occurring, or simply looking into the culture of the time, and seeing what people were experiencing in the day-to-day. The same could be said for popular music. As we progress, breaking down limitations and barriers in society, Pop art also advances and progresses. It is not afraid of experimentation or being on the bleeding edge. That can enhance our perceptions, encourage abstract thinking, or simply inspire us in new ways. In that sense, Pop art has a profound effect on the world.

During Members Month we asked “Why do you love being a member?”
Here are the responses:
  • Oh what a time to be alive!
  • The lounge is great. Thanks for creating it. The Museum is terrific. It’s always interesting and there is something for people of all ages. It gives us grandparents a way to get a new generation into a love of the arts.
  • Revisiting my long-time friends—the magnificent and often changing collection of snuff bottles—in the Asian art gallery. And now, the Members’ Lounge—a great, confortable space to get away from the crowds.
  • Such a special place. So good for the soul.
  • Because I like art.
  • I just joined today 3/4/16 and I joined because these are fantastic museums! Also, being a member will make me come up to Philly more often from Baltimore.
  • Having unlimited access to world class art.
  • I love art! Expressing texture, forms, color, etc. etc. etc! Beauty in every form!
  • PMA is my home away from home. Always refreshing and new. Can’t get enough of what PMA has to offer. Thank you, PMA.
  • Attending spotlight conversations.
  • I love being a member because of the way I feel when I am here. I have been a member for 40 years. I am an Art History Grad. I share the Museum with everyone. Here today with 94 year-old Mother and 82 year-old Mother-in-Law. A bit of beauty, history, and a great lunch are in order.
  • We heart art!
  • I’m a member as well as a volunteer at the Museum. I love the programs here, the people, not to mention the great art collection! Here, everyone can find something fun to do! I absolutely love this new Members’ Lounge, especially the “postcard station!” What an awesome idea. It’s great to be a member at the PMA!
  • All the staff are so nice and the Museum is so kind friendly! We especially love Art After 5.
  • By being members we feel more inclined to come because we feel a part of the Museum. We’re making art part of our lives.
  • Because I can relax in the lounge with tea or coffee while I decide which members-only collection tour to take next and discover neat art catalogues, like “Landscape of Slavery” edited by Mack and Hoffius, tucked among Miro works on the wall.
  • I like art and it is an art museum and I like learning about art. I like seeing famous art, and I like doing art.
  • I heart that you are open late on Wed + Fridays 2x the opportunities to explore=happiness. Thank you
  • Art Museum membership is one of my best annual investments. Art and beauty, all year long!
  • Now that I am a member, I am discovering parts of the Museum that I have never seen. I can come for short—or long—visits whenever I want!
  • Membership makes us part of the legacy of art. Supporting PMA is a way of contributing to the community in a positive way! The Museum is cool and comfortable (and totally tubular)
  • The Philadelphia Museum of Art definitely appreciates its members more than other similar institutions I’ve been a member at.
  • Love is in the air. Life is so civilized when you are a member.
  • I like the Knights (age 4). Art Splash + Armor (age 12). The family hands-on events.
  • I live in the neighborhood and there is always something going on at the Museum if I have no plans. Plus, it expands my mind!
  • I like how the Museum is working hard to broaden its appeal in creative ways in the physical space, new tour ideas, programs, etc. Keep on!
  • Oh, how do I love thee—let me count the ways! (Too many to count).
  • Members are treated with great care. We can feel at home here. Thank you, a member.
  • The Museum is a global treasure, and I love being a part of it. The exhibits and programming are bold and innovative, with an outstanding historic collection as well.
  • Art. They have pencils. I like to draw pictures. I like to see art. (age 3)
  • That I get to make art. (age 5)
  • I like being a member because you can see art for free.

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we asked our members how they think art can serve people.

Claudia Librett, member since 2009, eloquently responded:

Illuminating truth, beauty, and love. Often truth that we shy away from is embraced or at least received when it is expressed through art. Beauty in nature and in art inspires and quiets our souls. Only when we move with our hearts in making art does it express and embody love.

No one can really thrive without art.

Practically from birth, my mom introduced me to great art in all forms and it has informed my career choices, enriched my life and fed my soul. I know for certain that it will do all that for my daughter as well.

Close


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For more information, please contact Membership by phone at 215-684-7840 or by e-mail at .

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