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November 5, 1996 - December 29, 1996
This two-hour program surveys three decades of videos and artworks made in the urban or industrial landscape. The program begins with the recently completed documentation of three of Robert Smithson's historical earth-works from the 1960s, and one of Gordon Matta-Clark's famous carvings of an abandoned building. The final works include a chronicle of Rachel Whiteread's controversial House, which stood in London for three months before being demolished, and a video compiled from footage of demolitions by blasting.
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October 6, 1996 - December 2, 1996
The late Edna Beron was a cherished member of this Museum's community and a remarkable art collector. This installation includes the first painting that Mrs. Beron purchased -- Young Love by Philip Evergood -- as well as the last object she bought -- Love Boat, a soup tureen by the centenarian American ceramicist Beatrice Wood.
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September 14, 1996 - November 24, 1996
Born in 1912, Harry Callahan has for more than fifty years used his photography to understand and reveal his relationship to the world around him. This exhibition of Callahan's expressive, autobiographical photographs charts his artistic development from its genesis in Detroit in the early 1940s and its flowering in Chicago in the late 1940s and 1950s to its maturation in Providence and Atlanta, where he now lives.
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September 2, 1996 - November 3, 1996
The selection of videos shown here originally accompanied the exhibition Féminin/Masculin, displayed at the Musée National d'Art Moderne (Centre Georges Pompidou) in Paris this past winter. The videos survey twenty-five years of works dealing with gender identity and relations between the sexes.
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March 30, 1996 - October 2, 1996
This first exhibition of contemporary art ever mounted in the Rodin Museum presents some 20 photographs by Ernestine Ruben (born 1931).
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July 9, 1996 - September 1, 1996
In this video program, several contemporary artists discuss their art and working methods. The program begins with a 1958 interview with Marcel Duchamp, whose influence as artist, advisor, and muse pervades these galleries.
Portrait of Madame Cézanne
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May 30, 1996 - September 1, 1996
An international loan exhibition spanning the career of Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) has been organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art in collaboration with the Réunion de Musées Nationaux / Musée d'Orsay in Paris and the Tate Gallery in London. The three organizing museums will be the only venues for this unprecedented gathering of some 100 oil paintings, 35 watercolors, and 35 drawings from public and private collections.
Père de La Tour
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May 30, 1996 - September 1, 1996
Eighty-one drawings from two Cézanne sketchbooks given to the Museum in 1987 by Ambassador and Mrs. Walter H. Annenberg will present the full range of the artist's subject matter from the early 1880s to about 1900. On view in Gallery 165 in the 19th-century galleries, first floor, adjunct to the rotunda.
"Alpha Centauri" Vase
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March 6, 1996 - August 31, 1996
Twentieth Century Glass is an installation of approximately 13 pieces of glass drawn from the Museum's extensive collection of twentieth-century design objects. Ranging in date from the 1920s to the present, the pieces illustrate various stylistic movements of the twentieth century, from the sculptural approach to the medium by glass artists such as Maurice Mariot, to the revival of engraved decoration most notably by the Swedish firm of Orrefors, to the playfulness of the glass of the 1980s produced for the Italian firm of Memphis. The installation also includes the work of a number of the twentieth-century's greatest glass artists including René Lalique and Paolo Venini.
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June 22, 1996 - August 18, 1996
Metamorphoses: Photography in the Electronic Age appears at a charged moment in the evolution of photography. With digital-imaging technology, photographs can now be created, enhanced, and altered in the computer. This breakthrough has forced a re-evaluation of still images and the widely accepted concept of "photographic truth." The exhibition celebrates the creative potential of the digital image and demands a fresh look at the relationship between photographs and the realities they represent.
Lancaster (In the Province No. 2)
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May 5, 1996 - August 11, 1996
In the early decades of this century, rapid technological advances were radically changing life in this country. American artists searched for a new identity, a means of expressing their commitment to the modernist movements coming out of Europe in a purely American way. This exhibition traces American responses to the machine age through prints, drawings, and photographs from the permanent collection by such artists as Paul Strand, Edward Weston, Charles Sheeler, John Marin, and Louis Lozowick.
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June 9, 1996 - July 7, 1996
Marie-Ange Guilleminot's video My Dolls is being shown in conjunction with a recently purchased work by this young Parisian artist entitled Navels (also on display in this gallery). Navels consists of plaster casts made on the bodies of seventy-four of Guilleminot's acquaintances. In My Dolls, the artist again uses the process of moulding, raising similar issues of intimacy and identity as she works the pliable blobs that are her "dolls."
Red Camellia
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December 15, 1995 - June 15, 1996
This exhibition features paintings of flowers and plants by Chinese artists of the 15th to early 19th centuries, including works by leading masters of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) such as Hsu Wei (1551-1593) and Hsia Ch'ang (1388-1470).
Untitled, No. 15 (Ice)
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March 17, 1996 - May 27, 1996
In 1979, the Hunt Manufacturing Co. initiated a series of generous grants to the Philadelphia Museum of Art for the acquisition of "adventurous and risk-taking" contemporary art on paper. The first phase of acquisitions culminated in an exhibition of the works of forty-six artists in 1988. New Art on Paper 2 celebrates the conclusion of the second phase and presents new works by thirty-five artists made and acquired between 1988 and 1995.
Nasturtiums, Oceano, California
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February 15, 1996 - April 21, 1996
This exhibition will include works by a broad chronological range of artists, including Albrecht Dürer, Pierre Joseph Redouté, Currier and Ives, Henri Matisse, Ansel Adams, and Andy Warhol. These artists depict flowers in a variety of ways: as purely decorative elements in larger compositions, as symbols of virtues and emotions, or as subjects in themselves.
Figures in a Landscape
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February 11, 1996 - March 31, 1996
Sidney Goodman , a major exhibition presenting over 50 paintings and drawings from public and private collections throughout the country, is the first retrospective of the nationally renowned Philadelphia artist to be shown in his hometown. Goodman emerged in the early 1960's as one of the leading American artists in the return to the human figure as a primary subject, and has remained an influential force in contemporary art for some 30 years.
Lily
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February 25, 1996 - March 3, 1996
While China is known as the "mother of gardens," and had a strong tradition of floral iconography that influenced the art of its neighbors, the Japanese developed their own esthetic and literary traditions in the world of flowers. Japan in Flower showcases both works reflecting the Chinese influence and others that are distinctly Japanese. The exhibition will be on view during the week of the Philadelphia Flower Show from February 25 through March 3, 1996.
"Whistling Bird" Teakettle
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October 25, 1995 - February 25, 1996
This installation chronicles the process that Michael Graves, one of the twentieth century's most renowned architects and product designers, followed in developing the design of three teakettles.
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December 16, 1995 - February 18, 1996
Jodice's photographs, taken between 1990 and 1995 at archaeological sites from Spain to Syria, link viewers with a historical and mythic past that continues to influence the present. This exhibition is the artist's first one-person show in the United States.
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November 25, 1995 - February 12, 1996
This exhibition presents a selection of works on paper that illustrates the wide historical range of the foundation's interests. Objects from the foundation's collections of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American decorative art and painting can be seen in the American galleries of this Museum.

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