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Share your thoughts about this exhibition.

Have you ever experienced a life-saving situation?

Who is your hero?

How do you feel about images of disaster and rescue? About Homer’s work?

A wonderful moving exhibit. I found it so emotional. I had a hard time not crying. The life around the sea must be the harshest. The other artists in this exhibit were marvelous to see and I thank all the people who owned these paintings for sharing them with me and all who see them. I live in a great area and am happy to belong to the museum.

Posted from the Gallery
mary anne s - 12.19.2012 - 2:06 PM
One of the best-curated exhibitions I have even viewed! The storytelling focus of the explanatory placards superbly complements the storytelling found in the paintings. The texts help us see what it is that the painter sees, and choose to highlight. Extremely well done!

Posted from the Gallery
Ellen Frankel, Philadelphia, 12/16/12 - 12.16.2012 - 3:56 PM
The winter coast picture has the WORLDS WORST FRAME to MATCH the picture.

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----- - 12.15.2012 - 4:47 PM
We liked the painting, Shipwreck, by William Trost Richards. It seems peaceful at first, but then you notice the broken mast and the subtle ship in the background to indicate the disaster that had happened. It really left an impression on us.

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Grace and Brenda - 12.15.2012 - 4:39 PM
I have enjoyed the Shipwreck exhibit and my favorite painting is Winter Coast. The texture in the paintings were great. I also enjoyed the books in the exhibit.

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Carson Butler-12 - 12.13.2012 - 4:53 PM
I have been a member of the Philadelphia Art Museum for awhile now, and, I am really amazed on how many exhibitions there are in this city!!! So many great artists in this area! I enjoyed Shipwreck! by Winslow Homer very much!!!!

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Barbara S. - 12.13.2012 - 12:50 PM
I am always in awe of the power of the waves, as a swimmer, boater and artist. I especially admire the way these artists have captured their power.

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Shirley - 12.12.2012 - 1:34 PM
on the behest of nephew, conor - here am i.with sibling in towsurprisingly serene,the greens have rootsthe blues have moodthe reds, well always have passionhistory is completewe search, neverthelessfor what is lostfor what is not losthas no pigment121212

Posted from the Gallery
s gili post - 12.12.2012 - 12:45 PM
as a 14 year old i was on the crew of a 27 foot scow racing on lake geneva in wisconsinfor once we were leading a race of some 30 boats in a gusty and very windy dayi was out on one of the lee boards and hit by a gust the boat lurched and i slipped and fell offthank goodness i had a life preserver but i was rattled and fell some distance before going under and then bobbing upof course they had to circle back and rescue me; the captain complaining i had lost the race for them

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sam - 12.11.2012 - 10:47 AM
We are all getting older. My only negative comment is that the printing is too small on the descriptions. The pictures are so full of emotion but I had to work too hard to read the helpful notes. Thank you for such a moving exhibit.

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roberta - 12.8.2012 - 4:08 PM
This is our third time ... Have loved each visit and learned and noticed more each time. We will continue to sail....

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Marget - 12.8.2012 - 3:55 PM
This was a very unique and inspirational exhibit. I loved almost every painting. The usage of colors in most of the darker paintings were great. Probably one of my favorite paintings was the one with the sharks. It was simple and used bright and vivid colors. Which didn't portray the incident as something scary, but more as something normal. I found this to be very interesting, and different. I also loved how much emotion was portrayed in some of the paintings. Every person was doing something, and every detail gave something. My father said that you could almost hear the sobbing in one of the paintings. The emotion was incredible, the colors were amazing, and the detail was great. I very much enjoyed this exhibit, it surpassed my expectations.

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Aerianna - 12.8.2012 - 3:18 PM
My daughter, husband and friend have thoroughly enjoyed this exhibition!!! Before this exhibition, I had only seen the one painting "Life Line", and now after this special exhibit, I realized that Homer's work was just the tip of the iceberg regarding shipwrecks, survivors and the waiting family genre. I especially loved the two small paintings by Homer of the children and mother standing by the seashore in the light, while the darkening skies and surf encroach in the backdrop. Not only did Homer highlight a much needed life saving force, such as the US and English Coast Guard, via his depictions; but he also illustrated the bravery of the common man against nature. My daughter, who loves the Studio Ghiblee film, "Ponyo" compared Homer's painting of the sharks near a lifeboat, to images in Miyasaki's film. So, not only was Homer a fantastic herald for more life saving personnel for ocean work; but also a harbinger of colors and style used in modern day animation. KEEP UP THE GREAT WORK PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART! We have been members of the museum for three years, and every time we come, we enjoy every exhibition more and more, and always enjoy something new to stimulate the heart and mind in its artistry.

Posted from the Gallery
Victoria Sherlaw - 12.8.2012 - 3:09 PM
I grew up in Cape May, NJ and spent 2 summers working on a wooden fishing trawler named Dolphin. Seeing these scenes of disasters on the coast reminds me of the havoc of the storm of March 1962 I saw from the boardwalk as it began to wash away. We lost the abandoned victorian era lifeboat station at Cape May Point in that storm.Thank you to the staff of PMOA for this extraordinary exhibit of the works of one of my most favorite artists.

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Joseph Assan - 12.8.2012 - 2:32 PM
I liked the picture of the doggie that saved the hat.

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Mira Acharya - 12.8.2012 - 2:03 PM
A splendid exhibit. I was glad to see some reference to Homer's painting over certain scenes -- reminding us that the artist has a life to live and must put bread on the table. He subsists on the income from his paintings.Recommend better lighting in the room where the reprint of the Harpers article was available for reading -- it was dark and the paper is dark, too!

Posted from the Gallery
Dr Joe - 12.6.2012 - 3:10 PM
The continuous contemporary lifeguard video with loud audio interfered with my ability to read about the works presented in the exhibit. Many times the audio loop played to an empty room, but the sound carried to the far reaches of the exhibition. Two suggestions: Either have the sound be opt ON (activated by a button on the screen when a viewer wanted to listen) or provide earphones for visitors. The constant noise marred an otherwise lovely exhibition.

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Wendy from Wynnewood - 12.4.2012 - 2:21 PM
i agree with myna german great work but didnt see new building

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jack - 12.2.2012 - 3:38 PM
As soon as I walked in and started looking around, I thought of the earthquake/flood in Japan, last year where was shown the ship tipping over the edge of a wave. I also re-experienced, in many of the paintings and prints, the power of the ocean, now difficult it is to climb out when caught in the swirling currents. I also wondered how the melodramatic qualities got into these pictures, such that women were portrayed in white and as helpless, sentimental figures. A man rescuing a woman from the ocean---whereas, if you think about it, coming out of the ocean is a form of birth, being pulled out, helplessly.

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Elaine M. Hyman - 12.1.2012 - 3:38 PM
Beautiful, well-organized exhibition - far better than most 'focus' shows of this type. I loved the fact that you placed shipwreck scenes in historical context with European pictures complimenting and informing the American works on view. Also like the inclusion of mass-culture popular prints.

Posted from the Gallery
Paul Jeromack - 11.30.2012 - 4:26 PM

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