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About the Artists

Mohamed Bourouissa

Exploring existing power relations and their inherent tensions, Mohamed Bourouissa’s work is based in photography but its contents are steeped in art historical painting and references. In his various photographic series, the artist blurs the line between documentary photography and fiction, either by carefully staging his compositions (Périphéries) or by delegating the photographic gaze to others (Temps mort). Born in Algeria in 1978, Bourouissa grew up in Paris. After attending École nationale supérieure des Arts Décoratifs, where he specialized in photography, he received his master’s degree from the Sorbonne, also in Paris, in 2004. Bourouissa has been featured in a number of solo shows internationally at and his work was also included in the 6th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art (2010), The Generational: Younger than Jesus in 2009 at the New Museum, New York, and in ILLUMInation at the 54th Venice Biennial (2011), among other exhibitions.

Tobias Zielony

Documenting the lives of teenagers living on the fringes of urban environments, Tobias Zielony investigates youth culture of the marginal spaces of society. The relationship between people and location is at once specific to these places and yet resonates with other similar nondescript spaces around the world, indicating the presence of a globalization that has become the norm. Zielony’s interest is not only in the people who live in these places but in the architectural and urban context of these locations that exist as indicators of embedded political and economic structures. Born in Wuppertal, Germany, in 1973, Zielony studied documentary photography at the University of Wales, and art photography at the HGB Academy of Visual Arts in Leipzig. Since 2004 he has been featured in a number of solo exhibitions and his work has been included in group exhibitions such as the 7th International Biennial of Photography and Visual Arts (2010) in Liège, Belgium; Morality Act 1 at Witte de With, Rotterdam, Netherlands, in 2009–10; and Populism at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, in 2005-06.
 

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