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Pop Art and Artists

An international movement that originated in London and New York, Pop Art, or what artist James Rosenquist called "the world of supermarket junk and plenty," began as a response to the explosion of mass culture in the 1960s. In its creation, artists appropriated imagery from billboards, newspapers, films, comic books, and other media, and used commercial materials and techniques such as silkscreening, often enlarging images to colossal proportions.

Pop Art, the world of supermarket junk and plenty, began as a response to the explosion of mass culture in the 1960s.

Pop artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Claes Oldenburg, and their predecessors such as Robert Rauschenberg, transgressed the assumed boundary between fine art and graphic design, raising provocative questions about the nature of creativity and originality in the age of mechanical reproduction.

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