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Walking Tour of Jacques Lipchitz Sculptures in Philadelphia

With its rich tradition of public art, Philadelphia has long been a landmark destination for admirers of sculptor Jacques Lipchitz. Works from all periods of the artist’s long and prolific career have an important presence inside and outside the Philadelphia Museum of Art, opposite City Hall, and along the banks of the Schuylkill River. Although he never lived in the city, Lipchitz had a great affection for its people, its art, and its architecture.

A Jewish immigrant from Lithuania, Lipchitz moved to Paris in 1909 and soon emerged as the leading Cubist sculptor of his generation. The artist’s ties to Philadelphia began in 1922, when renowned American collector Dr. Albert C. Barnes visited his Paris studio and commissioned him to create seven relief carvings for the Barnes Foundation building in Merion, Pennsylvania. After arriving in the United States as a war refugee in 1941, Lipchitz visited Philadelphia frequently. Lipchitz remains an artist of tremendous popular appeal, whose powerful work redefined the possibilities of modern sculpture.

  • Download the Walking Tour Self-Guide. PDF [1.1 MB]

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