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Face Vessel
Face Vessel, c. 1860-70
Attributed to Thomas J. Davies Pottery, Edgefield district, South Carolina,
Glazed stoneware, unglazed earthenware
6 3/8 x 5 5/8 inches (16.2 x 14.2 cm)
Gift of Edward Russell Jones, 1904
1904-37
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building
African American Folk Art
May 20, 1992 - August 16, 1992
An installation in the American galleries features works by late 19th and early 20th-century African American craft artists. Although self-taught and completely outside academic art circles, the power of perception and directness of observation shown by these artists have attracted the attention of a wide contemporary audience. Among the artists represented are Tennessee sculptor William Edmondson, who was led by divine inspiration to carve his distinctive stone sculptures of animal and human forms; Peter Simmons, born into slavery in 1855, who became one of Charleston's preeminent metalworkers; an unknown carver whose walking sticks have descended through black families in south-central Virginia; and William Traylor, born into slavery in 1854, who at the age of 84 began creating powerful narrative drawings while living in Montgomery, Alabama.

Curator

Jack Lindsey

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