Morning Light, Interior

Daniel Garber, American, 1880 - 1958

Date:
1923

Medium:
Oil on canvas

Dimensions:
30 1/16 x 25 1/8 inches (76.4 x 63.8 cm)

Copyright:
Research inconclusive. Copyright may apply.

Curatorial Department:
Modern and Contemporary Art

Object Location:

* Gallery 49, Modern and Contemporary Art, ground floor

Accession Number:
1945-57-191

Credit Line:
Gift of Elise Robinson Paumgarten from the Sallie Crozer Hilprecht Collection, 1945

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Label:
After Daniel Garber began teaching at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, he divided his time between Bucks County and Philadelphia. Best known for his depictions of the countryside and quarries along the Delaware River, Garber was also noted for his large-scale figure compositions and interiors, which often incorporated close friends and family members. This painting depicts Garber's eldest daughter, Tanis, in the family's town house on Green Street in Philadelphia.

Additional information:
  • PublicationMasterpieces from the Philadelphia Museum of Art: Impressionism and Modern Art

    In addition to being a longtime teacher at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, Daniel Garber was a leading figure in the celebrated artists' colony near the town of New Hope, Pennsylvania, during the first half of the twentieth century. These painters recorded the fleeting effects of light as it illuminated their local surroundings, often gaining them comparisons to the French Impressionists. Garber, who toured Europe on a two-year Cresson Travel Scholarship from 1905 to 1907, had encountered the Impressionists' work firsthand and particularly shared their attraction to effects of light. Besides landscapes, Garber was recognized for his large-scale figure compositions and interiors, which often included his close friends and family members. Exhibited in the artist's 1945 retrospective at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Morning Light, Interior depicts Garber's eldest daughter, Tanis, in the family's home on Green Street in Philadelphia. But the reflective surfaces and palpable warmth of the composition reveal that light itself is the principal subject of the painting. Garber would utilize this sun-drenched room in at least two other paintings: South Room---Green Street (1921; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.) and Interior, Green Street (1923; Muskegon Museum of Art, Michigan). Melissa Kerr, from Masterpieces from the Philadelphia Museum of Art: Impressionism and Modern Art (2007), p. 210.

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