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Eternal Springtime

Signed to right behind support of arm: Rodin Foundry mark left side of base: F. BARBEDIENNE, FONDEUR

Auguste Rodin, French, 1840 - 1917. Cast by Ferdinand Barbedienne, French, 1810 - 1892.

Geography:
Made in France, Europe

Date:
Modeled 1884; cast between 1898-1918

Medium:
Bronze

Dimensions:
26 x 31 1/2 x 15 1/2 inches (66 x 80 x 39.4 cm)

Curatorial Department:
Rodin Museum

Object Location:

* Rodin Museum, West Gallery

Accession Number:
F1929-7-18

Credit Line:
Bequest of Jules E. Mastbaum, 1929

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Label:
Eternal Springtime developed out of Rodin’s ambitious project for The Gates of Hell (Philadelphia Museum of Art, F1929-7-128), and demonstrates the artist’s tendency to reuse and adapt figures from earlier compositions. The female figure is based on a sensuous torso that appears in the upper left portion of The Gates. Here she is fully formed and joined in an erotic embrace with a male figure who has small wings on his back, like the mythological figure Cupid.

Additional information:
  • PublicationMasterpieces from the Philadelphia Museum of Art: Impressionism and Modern Art

    Exhibited at the annual Paris Salon under the title Cupid and Psyche, the sculpture now commonly known as Eternal Springtime developed out of Rodin's ambitious project for The Gates of Hell. Working with small-scale figures in plaster and driven by his immersion in the poetry of Baudelaire, Dante, and Ovid, Rodin explored universal themes such as human love in the 1880s. The fluidity of the artist's working process is especially visible in this composition, which reuses and adapts figures from another work. The female figure is based on the sensuous torso of a woman---called Torso of Adèle after the woman who modeled for it---in the upper left tympanum of The Gates. Here, she is fully formed and is joined in an erotic embrace with a male figure who has small wings on his back, like the figure of Eros or Cupid. A sentimental work, Eternal Springtime was reproduced many times in both marble and bronze. The floating, weightless limbs of the figures in the original plaster model, also at the Rodin Museum in Philadelphia, become heavier and more earthbound in the bronze version with the introduction of the rock on which the pair leans. Jennifer A. Thompson, from Masterpieces from the Philadelphia Museum of Art: Impressionism and Modern Art (2007), p. 102.

* Works in the collection are moved off view for many different reasons. Although gallery locations on the website are updated regularly, there is no guarantee that this object will be on display on the day of your visit.

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